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Politics of Fashion: People Going Crazy for Sarah Palin's Shoes, Hair, Glasses—Naughty Monkey and Wigs Galore!

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Fashion folks love Michelle Obama—her fashion forward style, her politics, the whole fabulous package. But the masses are going crazy over Sarah Palin's whole package—the twirl of an up do, the sky-high red peep-toe heels, the rectangular rimless glasses! People can't get enough, according to the WSJ, which has chronicled the buying frenzy. Here, an outline:

1) Naughty Monkey Shoes: This is the shoe label Palin wore when she was announced at McCain's running mate; the 3 1/2-inch red peep-toes are pictured left. A label Paris Hilton has worn, the shoes are "generally are geared to women in their early to mid-20s who go clubbing." At Endless.com (owned by Amazon), "sales of the red Naughty Monkey shoes shot up 50%, to thousands of pairs."

2) Kazuo Kawasaki Glasses: Palin's precise glasses are on back order. VP of Italee Optics Inc. Amy Hahn, the brand's US distributor, told the paper: "the turning point was at the convention...The next day, our phone started ringing off the hook. Now we're doing everything we can to keep up," including a 24-hour production cycle.

3) The Hair, The Wigs: In the past week, John Barrett, whose salon is in the penthouse of Bergdorf Goodman, has given five clients the Palin up do: "People are requesting it—it shows off the cheekbones...I can't emphasize enough how her angled bangs and hair color are so beautifully executed." And at Wigsalon.com, in the past week, it's sold 25 Palin-like wigs, from $46-$100. "And it's not even close to Halloween," owner Joe Aronesty told the pub. No, Joe, these women are frighteningly serious.
· Palin's Style Sparks Buying Frenzy, And Fashion Firms Rush to Cash In [WSJ]